Skill-Based Guidance in Developing Emotional Intelligence

The Creative Learning Center is a place to safely get your needs met not only academically, but socially, emotionally, and behaviorally. Bullying and fear of safety is an epidemic in our schools today. The problem is that schools think that simply by being with other children, social and emotional skills are learned. I don’t see how “the blind leading the blind,” “dog eat dog,” or “the pecking order” are ways to learn these skills in a healthy manner. Emotional intelligence is a learned behavior for most of us. If a child is actively and experientially taught how to handle conflict, the emotions of themselves and others, and healthy communication skills between the ages of 5 to 10 years old, the maturity that happens between 11 and 13 years old often allows a young person to have a working emotional intelligence. Because of our open-ended, flexible educational model for academics at The Creative Learning Center, the adult mentors and facilitators are in a position to guide children in gaining skills toward developing socially, emotionally, and behaviorally as well as academics.

 Understanding Differences

Some of us are born with “more.” Bodies and emotions are powerful things. Some of us are more sensitive. Some of us implode; some of us explode. Some have a hard time dealing with the physical input from our environments. Some of us are more perceptive. There are lots of different types of “more.” We all do the best we can with the skills we have. How nice would it be to have mentors who will help give us better skills where we lack, and build on the ones that do work. Here are some of the models we will use at The Creative Learning Center:

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Communication Tools

Communication is a learned skill. Prioritizing relationship first is the key to the best communication. Trusting that everyone is trying to do the best they can helps us dismiss the idea that anyone is “out to get us” or “make us mad.” Respect, connection, and modeling allows a mentor to share skills that will matter and make a difference. Here are some of the models we will use at The Creative Learning Center:

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howtoreallyparent                              fivelovelanguageschildren

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